Arne M. Sorenson, the CEO of Marriott International, spoke out forcefully against Indiana’s RFRA law, as well as the many other RFRA bills, like Georgia’s, now making their way through state legislatures across the country.

Referring to RFRA bills as “pure idiocy” Arne Sorenson joins the ranks of other CEOs to speak out against these “license to discriminate” bill including Tim Cook of Apple and Marc Benioff of Salesforce.

In a speech, Sorenson said:

“The notion that you can tell businesses somehow that they are free to discriminate against people because of who they are is madness.”

Sorenson called on the state of Indiana to fix RFRA so the state can put this madness behind them.

Indiana serves as a harrowing example of what Georgia stands to lose should our state’s General Assembly follow suit and pass RFRA into law.

Last week, supporters of Georgia’s RFRA tabled their bill after an amendment was added clarifying that the law could not be used as a “license to discriminate.” Now chances look good that Georgian’s can defeat RFRA once and for all, but until the General Assembly adjourns for the year on Thursday at midnight, supporters could slip RFRA into an unrelated bill and try to sneak this discriminatory law past the people of Georgia. Stay tuned as this bill unfolds by following Georgia Unites Against Discrimination on Facebook.

" />
Get Email Updates

Take Action

Featured Voice

Mother of Transgender Daughter Urges Opponents of Equality to Put Fear Aside and Help Children Flourish Jen Slipakoff ~ Kennesaw, Georgia
Marriott CEO Arne M. Sorenson slams RFRA March 31, 2015

marriottfbArne M. Sorenson, the CEO of Marriott International, spoke out forcefully against Indiana’s RFRA law, as well as the many other RFRA bills, like Georgia’s, now making their way through state legislatures across the country.

Referring to RFRA bills as “pure idiocy” Arne Sorenson joins the ranks of other CEOs to speak out against these “license to discriminate” bill including Tim Cook of Apple and Marc Benioff of Salesforce.

In a speech, Sorenson said:

“The notion that you can tell businesses somehow that they are free to discriminate against people because of who they are is madness.”

Sorenson called on the state of Indiana to fix RFRA so the state can put this madness behind them.

Indiana serves as a harrowing example of what Georgia stands to lose should our state’s General Assembly follow suit and pass RFRA into law.

Last week, supporters of Georgia’s RFRA tabled their bill after an amendment was added clarifying that the law could not be used as a “license to discriminate.” Now chances look good that Georgian’s can defeat RFRA once and for all, but until the General Assembly adjourns for the year on Thursday at midnight, supporters could slip RFRA into an unrelated bill and try to sneak this discriminatory law past the people of Georgia. Stay tuned as this bill unfolds by following Georgia Unites Against Discrimination on Facebook.

Twitter Icon@GeorgiaUnites

We were so grateful to be able to profile Rachel last year. Her story is inspiring and it's sad to see her treated unfairly. Thank you Rachel for standing up for yourself! bit.ly/2VTK7j3

About 8 months ago

Follow Us On Twitter