The discrimination that Jordan faced is an unfortunate fact of life for many LGBT people in Georgia. According to survey results included in a new report, Liberty & Justice in Georgia: Protecting Our Heritage & Growing Our Competitive Future, 45% of LGBT Georgians say they have been discriminated against or harassed at work over the last year.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Eighteen states and the District of Columbia have laws on the books that prohibit employers from mistreating their employees the way Jordan was just because she is transgender.

Georgia lawmakers must take action to ensure that no Georgian is discriminated against because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. The lives and livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of LGBT Georgians like Jordan depend on it.

They can do that right now by advancing HR 404, a bipartisan resolution that would create a study committee to consider the importance of LGBT protections. The committee would give lawmakers a chance to hear stories like Jordan’s and learn why these non-discrimination protections are so important—but there’s only two weeks left to advance the resolution.

You can take action too. If you support advancing non-discrimination protections for LGBT Georgians, click here to urge your lawmakers to advance HR 404 before the session ends on March 30th.

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Hurdles To Transitioning Without Non-Discrimination Protections Ames Simmons ~ Atlanta, Georgia
Jordan Bernard: I Was Forced Out of My Job for Being Transgender, And There Were No Laws To Protect Me April 25, 2017

Because there are no explicit federal or statewide non-discrimination protections for LGBT people in Georgia, they can be mistreated at and even fired from their jobs just because of who they are.

That’s what happened to Jordan Bernard. Jordan is a transgender woman—a fact that the store manager accepted when she was hired at her job. But four months in, a new store manager turned Jordan’s life upside down, asking her personal and invasive questions about her body and insisting that she dress in men’s clothing.

Even though Jordan complied, the manager started to gradually schedule her for fewer and fewer hours. Eventually, she was forced out entirely.

Watch Jordan’s full story:

The discrimination that Jordan faced is an unfortunate fact of life for many LGBT people in Georgia. According to survey results included in a new report, Liberty & Justice in Georgia: Protecting Our Heritage & Growing Our Competitive Future, 45% of LGBT Georgians say they have been discriminated against or harassed at work over the last year.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Eighteen states and the District of Columbia have laws on the books that prohibit employers from mistreating their employees the way Jordan was just because she is transgender.

Georgia lawmakers must take action to ensure that no Georgian is discriminated against because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. The lives and livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of LGBT Georgians like Jordan depend on it.

They can do that right now by advancing HR 404, a bipartisan resolution that would create a study committee to consider the importance of LGBT protections. The committee would give lawmakers a chance to hear stories like Jordan’s and learn why these non-discrimination protections are so important—but there’s only two weeks left to advance the resolution.

You can take action too. If you support advancing non-discrimination protections for LGBT Georgians, click here to urge your lawmakers to advance HR 404 before the session ends on March 30th.

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We were so grateful to be able to profile Rachel last year. Her story is inspiring and it's sad to see her treated unfairly. Thank you Rachel for standing up for yourself! bit.ly/2VTK7j3

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