The SCOTUS decision to remand the case to a lower court does NOT change the law. There is still significant legal precedent showing that Title IX protects transgender students. But this decision does highlight one glaring reality: Implicit federal protections for gay and transgender people simply are not enough.

That’s why we’re pushing, at the state level, to advance non-discrimination protections for LGBT people. This year marks the first year in Georgia’s history when lawmakers introduced legislation to address discrimination against the LGBT community. And not just a one-off bill. State lawmakers have introduced three separate LGBT-inclusive measures—House Resolution 404, House Bill 488 and Senate Bill 119—with the goal of creating a state civil rights law barring discrimination.

Right now, LGBT Americans are fighting at every level of government for the right to exist and fully participate in public life—be it securing a job, finding housing, or doing something as simple as using a public restroom.

And while it may feel like an uphill battle, this year in Georgia, we have charted a new course and taken a very important first step toward advancing non-discrimination protections that ensure LGBT people have a fair shot at happiness and success.

The Court’s decision on Gavin Grimm’s case is not the end of the road. This is just a detour. And we will keep fighting until the day that LGBT people are protected from discrimination in Georgia. If you’re ready to keep fighting with us, click here to sign Georgia Unites’ pledge in support of passing an LGBT-inclusive civil rights law in Georgia ASAP.

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Transgender Veteran Celebrates Historic Pentagon Announcement of Open Service for Transgender Americans Dana Fuchko ~ Atlanta, Georgia
Supreme Court Decision In Grimm Case Highlights The Need For LGBT-Inclusive GA Civil Rights Law March 7, 2017

Yesterday, the Supreme Court announced that they will not hear arguments in the highly anticipated case Gavin Grimm v. Gloucester County School Board. This case would have decided once and for all whether or not transgender students are protected from discrimination under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

The SCOTUS decision to remand the case to a lower court does NOT change the law. There is still significant legal precedent showing that Title IX protects transgender students. But this decision does highlight one glaring reality: Implicit federal protections for gay and transgender people simply are not enough.

That’s why we’re pushing, at the state level, to advance non-discrimination protections for LGBT people. This year marks the first year in Georgia’s history when lawmakers introduced legislation to address discrimination against the LGBT community. And not just a one-off bill. State lawmakers have introduced three separate LGBT-inclusive measures—House Resolution 404, House Bill 488 and Senate Bill 119—with the goal of creating a state civil rights law barring discrimination.

Right now, LGBT Americans are fighting at every level of government for the right to exist and fully participate in public life—be it securing a job, finding housing, or doing something as simple as using a public restroom.

And while it may feel like an uphill battle, this year in Georgia, we have charted a new course and taken a very important first step toward advancing non-discrimination protections that ensure LGBT people have a fair shot at happiness and success.

The Court’s decision on Gavin Grimm’s case is not the end of the road. This is just a detour. And we will keep fighting until the day that LGBT people are protected from discrimination in Georgia. If you’re ready to keep fighting with us, click here to sign Georgia Unites’ pledge in support of passing an LGBT-inclusive civil rights law in Georgia ASAP.

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We were so grateful to be able to profile Rachel last year. Her story is inspiring and it's sad to see her treated unfairly. Thank you Rachel for standing up for yourself! bit.ly/2VTK7j3

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