On March 27, the Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau sent a resolution in opposition to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to key leaders such as Governor Nathan Deal, Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle and Speaker of the House David Ralston.

The resolution begins clearly indicating the importance of the Bureau in correspondence to the Atlanta hospitality industry, which “generates more than $13 billion of economic benefit annually and employs a diverse workforce of more than 230,000.”

Because of the considered RFRA bill, which “has the potential to be unwelcoming and inconsistent with the experience our 45 million conventioneers and tourists have in Atlanta every year,” the industry community is worried that “negative perceptions associated with this legislation could tarnish Atlanta’s reputation as one of the world’s most welcoming cities.”

The negative effects from RFRA on the Georgia economy could be devastating, turning away business and potential employees, affecting not only the hospitality businesses and their employees but also all consumers in Georgia.  The resolution states that: “Therefore, be it resolved that Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau stands together with Atlanta’s hospitality and business community in opposition to the implementation of any legislation which could be used to potentially discriminate and will continue to work to ensure that every visitor to our city continues to be welcomed warmly and in accordance with our standards for excellent customer service.”

This resolution comes in the wake of Indiana’s Governor signing a similar RFRA bill yesterday. In response, the NCAA has made a statement strongly condemning the bill and major companies—including Apple, Salesforce, and Yelp—have slammed this “license to discriminate” law.

If implemented, RFRA could allow individuals and private businesses to ignore any laws that they claim conflict with their religious beliefs including nondiscrimination laws. It’s not too late to urge lawmakers to stop this harmful bill from passing, so make your voice heard!

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Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau: RFRA is bad for business, bad for tourism and bad for Georgia! March 27, 2015

ConventionOn March 27, the Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau sent a resolution in opposition to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to key leaders such as Governor Nathan Deal, Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle and Speaker of the House David Ralston.

The resolution begins clearly indicating the importance of the Bureau in correspondence to the Atlanta hospitality industry, which “generates more than $13 billion of economic benefit annually and employs a diverse workforce of more than 230,000.”

Because of the considered RFRA bill, which “has the potential to be unwelcoming and inconsistent with the experience our 45 million conventioneers and tourists have in Atlanta every year,” the industry community is worried that “negative perceptions associated with this legislation could tarnish Atlanta’s reputation as one of the world’s most welcoming cities.”

The negative effects from RFRA on the Georgia economy could be devastating, turning away business and potential employees, affecting not only the hospitality businesses and their employees but also all consumers in Georgia.  The resolution states that: “Therefore, be it resolved that Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau stands together with Atlanta’s hospitality and business community in opposition to the implementation of any legislation which could be used to potentially discriminate and will continue to work to ensure that every visitor to our city continues to be welcomed warmly and in accordance with our standards for excellent customer service.”

This resolution comes in the wake of Indiana’s Governor signing a similar RFRA bill yesterday. In response, the NCAA has made a statement strongly condemning the bill and major companies—including Apple, Salesforce, and Yelp—have slammed this “license to discriminate” law.

If implemented, RFRA could allow individuals and private businesses to ignore any laws that they claim conflict with their religious beliefs including nondiscrimination laws. It’s not too late to urge lawmakers to stop this harmful bill from passing, so make your voice heard!

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