a new poll from the Project Right Side (PRS) Foundation, 3 out of 4 Georgians mistakenly believe that it’s illegal under state law to fire someone because they’re gay or transgender. But that could not be further from the truth.

Former Atlanta resident Ashland Johnson is a case in point.

In her first job out of college Ashland worked in the registrar’s office at a small Atlanta school. Things went well for nearly a year. But one day, when Ashland was out sick, her boss found an email exchange between Ashland and her girlfriend. Evidently, her boss took issue with her sexual orientation, because by the time Ashland returned to work, her boss had already drafted resignation letter.

Watch Ashland’s full story here:

After she was fired, Ashland called HR and some LGBT rights organizations, but because Georgia has no statewide non-discrimination law explicitly protecting LGBT people from employment discrimination, there was nothing they could do to help her.

And Ashland is not the only Georgian to face such treatment at work. According to a recently released report, Liberty & Justice in Georgia: Protecting Our Heritage & Growing Our Competitive Future, 45% of LGBT Georgians say they have been discriminated against or harassed at their jobs.

No one should be discriminated against because of their sexual orientation or gender identity—and more and more Georgians agree. This year, we saw an unprecedented amount for LGBT-inclusive non-discrimination protections, including three legislative measures that would have made these protections a reality.

The legislative session may be over, but we’ll never stop pushing for LGBT non-discrimination in Georgia. If you’re with us, click here to sign the Georgia Unites Against Discrimination pledge.

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An LGBT-Inclusive Civil Rights Law Would Provide “Peace of Mind” for These Dads Derek & Donnie Broussard-Cormier ~ DeKalb County
Ashland Johnson: I Loved My First Job Out of College—Until I Was Fired for Being for Being A Lesbian April 18, 2017

According to a new poll from the Project Right Side (PRS) Foundation, 3 out of 4 Georgians mistakenly believe that it’s illegal under state law to fire someone because they’re gay or transgender. But that could not be further from the truth.

Former Atlanta resident Ashland Johnson is a case in point.

In her first job out of college Ashland worked in the registrar’s office at a small Atlanta school. Things went well for nearly a year. But one day, when Ashland was out sick, her boss found an email exchange between Ashland and her girlfriend. Evidently, her boss took issue with her sexual orientation, because by the time Ashland returned to work, her boss had already drafted resignation letter.

Watch Ashland’s full story here:

After she was fired, Ashland called HR and some LGBT rights organizations, but because Georgia has no statewide non-discrimination law explicitly protecting LGBT people from employment discrimination, there was nothing they could do to help her.

And Ashland is not the only Georgian to face such treatment at work. According to a recently released report, Liberty & Justice in Georgia: Protecting Our Heritage & Growing Our Competitive Future, 45% of LGBT Georgians say they have been discriminated against or harassed at their jobs.

No one should be discriminated against because of their sexual orientation or gender identity—and more and more Georgians agree. This year, we saw an unprecedented amount for LGBT-inclusive non-discrimination protections, including three legislative measures that would have made these protections a reality.

The legislative session may be over, but we’ll never stop pushing for LGBT non-discrimination in Georgia. If you’re with us, click here to sign the Georgia Unites Against Discrimination pledge.

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We were so grateful to be able to profile Rachel last year. Her story is inspiring and it's sad to see her treated unfairly. Thank you Rachel for standing up for yourself! bit.ly/2VTK7j3

About 5 months ago

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