For the past four years, the American Collegiate Rowing Association (ACRA) has held their nation championship at the Lake Lanier Olympic Venue in Gainsville, GA from the 1996 Atlanta Games. The event has drawn in over 1500 athletes from 63 universities, bringing in $2 million in economic activity in just the past two years.

ACRA has enjoyed the welcoming and supportive community of Gainsville for their annual championship, but due to recently proposed RFRA legislation that would create a “license to discriminate” in Georgia, ACRA has been forced to rethink their relationship with the state over concerns that such a law could lead to discrimination against their student athletes, coaching staff and fans.

In a statement ACRA wrote:

“Over the past two years, our sport has provided $2 million of economic impact to the region, and we look forward to continuing that mutually beneficial relationship.

However, we are deeply concerned with legislation being considered by the Georgia General Assembly (Senate Bill 129) that could negatively impact our athletic community, coaching staff, and fans. In particular, we are cognizant of the impact such legislation could have on the LGBT coaches, athletes and family members who attend the regatta annually. ACRA does not stand for discrimination in any form, and we will continue to monitor the issue in Georgia should this legislation be signed into law.”

With every hour, more and more businesses and organizations are coming out forcefully against Georgia’s “license to discriminate” RFRA. Which begs the question, what are our elected leaders thinking putting Georgia’s pro-business reputation at stake when millions of dollars and thousands of jobs are on the line?

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American Collegiate Rowing Association tells lawmakers: We may reconsider Georgia if RFRA becomes law! March 30, 2015

acrafbFor the past four years, the American Collegiate Rowing Association (ACRA) has held their nation championship at the Lake Lanier Olympic Venue in Gainsville, GA from the 1996 Atlanta Games. The event has drawn in over 1500 athletes from 63 universities, bringing in $2 million in economic activity in just the past two years.

ACRA has enjoyed the welcoming and supportive community of Gainsville for their annual championship, but due to recently proposed RFRA legislation that would create a “license to discriminate” in Georgia, ACRA has been forced to rethink their relationship with the state over concerns that such a law could lead to discrimination against their student athletes, coaching staff and fans.

In a statement ACRA wrote:

“Over the past two years, our sport has provided $2 million of economic impact to the region, and we look forward to continuing that mutually beneficial relationship.

However, we are deeply concerned with legislation being considered by the Georgia General Assembly (Senate Bill 129) that could negatively impact our athletic community, coaching staff, and fans. In particular, we are cognizant of the impact such legislation could have on the LGBT coaches, athletes and family members who attend the regatta annually. ACRA does not stand for discrimination in any form, and we will continue to monitor the issue in Georgia should this legislation be signed into law.”

With every hour, more and more businesses and organizations are coming out forcefully against Georgia’s “license to discriminate” RFRA. Which begs the question, what are our elected leaders thinking putting Georgia’s pro-business reputation at stake when millions of dollars and thousands of jobs are on the line?

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